Explorer

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1.1981 Gibson Les Paul Deluxe – Cherry Sunburst, (), (headstock), (back), (case). Another sweet vintage Deluxe, much like the 78 I put up recently except this ones Cherry Sunburst, instead of Tobacco. Overall lovely condition and at 33 years, is a true closet classic. The Cherry Sunburst finish retains strong color, rather than the faded red frequently found on old Pauls. Only light wear exhibited – just check out the pics. The worst flaws are two lacquer cracks in the top (shown here with flash) which are in the finish only. Features of the Deluxe were basically identical to the Standard except for pickups, where the Deluxe used the mini-humbuckers and the Standard used the PAF style humbuckers. A number of players prefer the mini-hums for their brighter tone; they fall between a PAF and a P90 to my ears. With a perfect neck angle and straight neck, this guitar sets up with low action. Look around the vintage sites and youll see few Deluxes going under $3K, and those that are seem to be in rough shape or not original. This is an excellent player with low action, nice sustain, and sweet, creamy tone. Like my buddy Ed says, old wood sounds better and judging by this guitar, a new one just doesnt have creamy tone. Clean vintage Pauls dont come along often and I think this one is a sweet deal at $2100, Includes original Protector case with all latches and hinges intact.

2.2008 Gibson 60 Les Paul Classic, Wine Red, w/Duncans, (front), (back), (headstock), (pickups), (case).Another cool 60 Classic with a mildly figured top, loaded with a great pair of Seymour Duncan humbuckers (SH-4 JB in bridge, SH1N 59 in neck). The 60 Classic has all the features you know and love including 60 slip taper neck, mahogany body with maple cap, all finished in a high-gloss, hand-sprayed nitrocellulose lacquer.The classic tone comes from this marriage of maples clarity and definition and mahoganys richness and depth which combine to produce a tonal complexity that no single-wood guitar has ever matched. Its resonance and sustain are only further enhanced by the deep-set quarter-sawn mahogany neck with 17-degree back-angled headstock.Features of the 1960 Classic are nearly identical to the Standard, with the primary difference being pickups, with the Classic is outfitted at the factory with ceramic humbuckers.Just like the Standard it features a mahogany body with maple cap.The only visual difference, other than the uncovered pickups, is the Classic screened logo, Classic truss cover, vintage-style inked serial number, and 1960 on the pickguard.Other features include 12 fretboard radius, light amber top-hat knobs, cream plastic parts, inlaid pearloid logo, and aged-looking trapezoid fretboard inlays. Two minor flaws I need to point out: lines around the tuners where a bigger footprint set of Klusons were once installed (pic), and supposedly there was a hairline crack on the headstock which appears invisible now. It was less than 1 and only on the surface. Otherwise in very nice shape with excellent frets and a comfortable, low set up. If youre looking for a REAL Les Paul without spending a fortune, get this beauty for $1199(HOLD-Jeff T 5/24/17).Includes black Gibson case.

3.2006 Gibson Les Paul Studio Black, (front), (back), (headstock), (case).Since 1983 Gibson has offered the Studio as an affordable alternative to the Standard, with all the tone and playability, but without the fancy cosmetic appointments.Although initially it was an all-mahogany body, it soon evolved into the maple cap that made it even closer to the standard.At one point in the mid-80s they even made a Studio Standard which had a bound body and neck, still retaining the dot inlays and screened logo.A decade or so later Gibson added trapezoid fretboard inlays which makes the guitar look very much like a Standard from the audience perspective.It remains to this day and excellent and more affordable alternative to players who could care less about binding and inlaid logos. I see numerous performances on TV where the featured artist, or backup guitarist, is playing a Studio. These are guys who can afford high-end instruments, they just apparently prefer the vibe of the Studio. In 06 these models were not chambered, as recent models are. They of course are weight-relieved, as are all other Les Pauls since 1983. Features include solid mahogany body with maple cap, rounded 50s neck profile, rosewood fretboard, 490R and 498T Alnico II humbuckers, dual volume and tone controls with 3-way selector, Tuneomatic bridge with stop bar tailpiece, Gibson Deluxe tuners, gloss nitrocellulose lacquer finish, and chrome hardware.Judging by the clean condition of the frets and overall appearance, this guitar has seen very little use. No buckle scrapes, no fret wear, just a few clear coat scratches and dimples. With a new black Studio running $1499 you can save some hard earned cash on this great playing, good looking used model. $850 includes NOS TKL Canadian case, same specs as the old brown case.

4.2001 Gibson Les Paul Studio – Wine & Chrome, (front), (flame), (back), (headstock), (case). Rare flametop Studio, this is easily a AA top and although the beauty is somewhat lost on a dark wine stain, it looks great in good lighting. This is one of the older heavy Studios, before chambering became a standard feature on all LPs around 2005. Many players are seeking these out, with the belief that a better tone is worth the extra pound or two. The Studios remain the best value in the real Les Paul line, i.e. gloss finish, carved maple cap over mahogany body, trapezoid inlays, 490R and 498T Alnico humbucker, Gibson deluxe tuners, etc. Basic construction is the same as the Standard with the exception of cosmetic appointments such as body and neck binding. Cosmetically this one has its share of scratches and dings, but there are no breaks, repairs, or other issues. I attribute the flaws to a careless owner rather than extensive playing time as the frets are near perfect. Its a great playing Paul and for a lacquer finish Studio a nice buy, especially for the many players who are looking for a non-chambered body, which are becoming harder to find. With a new Studio in Wine selling for $1319, for the player this guitar offers substantial savings, an a lovely maple top. Just $779 and includes Gibson brown case. Case is missing the combo latch but other latches work fine.

5.1997 Gibson Les Paul Studio – Wine& Chrome, (front), (back), (headstock). Sort of the LP mate to the SG above, also finished in transparent red and from the same 97 production year, a quality era for Gibson. You might remember this guitar, which was originally listed as a great player but in rough condition (before-1before-2andbefore-3) with miscellaneous finish chips and wear around the edges, but no structural issues. Martin touched up the rough areas with some Wine stain, lacquer over the areas, and buffed out the body. While its certainly not mint, it is a very presentable guitar. The Studios remain the best value in the real Les Paul line, i.e. gloss finish, carved maple cap over mahogany body, trapezoid inlays, 490R and 498T Alnico humbucker, Gibson deluxe tuners, etc. Basic construction is the same as the Standard with the exception of cosmetic appointments such as body and neck binding. The original Studios, back in the early 80s, were a more distinct model, with an all mahogany body and dot inlays. Following that came the Studio Standard with binding, dots, and maple cap – and finally in the late 80s this model. Its a great playing Paul with very minor fret wear (pic) and no structural issues, no cracks, etc., and for a lacquer finish Studio a nice buy, especially for the many players who are looking for a non-chambered Studio, which are becoming harder to find. Just $839 with Gibson deluxe gigbag or $899 with a new, excellent quality, TKL wood/Tolex hardshell case.

6.2008 Gibson Les Paul Swamp Ash Studio, (front/back), (headstock), (caseandbox). Never retailed – unplayed condition and ships in original box. Gibson started their Smartwood Series in the mid-90s, utilizing sustainable woods which are both tonally acceptable, and eco-friendly. While many of these were exotic woods (such as Muira Piranga) we had never heard of, this is one of the newer models featuring good old Swamp Ash, a name thats been synonymous with guitars since the 50s. The Swamp Ash Les Paul is a limited edition model, although Gibson hasnt released total production numbers. The tone isnt radically different from a regular mahogany/maple body, but it does seem to have more punch, more pronounced in the mid-range; Billy Gibbons comes to mind. Most remarkably, this guitar weighs in at a remarkable 6.4 lbs., which would be light for a Strat or Tele, and unheard of for a Les Paul. Features include: satin natural finish, figured swamp ash cap over swamp ash body, rounded mahogany neck with rosewood fretboard, 490R and 498T Alnico II humbuckers, rosewood fretboard, chrome hardware, green leaf truss rod cover, dot inlays, Gibson Deluxe tuners, and satin finished Mahogany neck. A regular black Studio is going to run you $1319 and will probably weigh around 9 pounds or more. This beauty is immaculate and at 6.4 lbs. is one of the lightest guitars, much less Les Pauls, youll ever play – for just $1179. If youre looking for a Paul that you can play for 3 long sets without any shoulder fatigue, this is it. Includes black reptile case, manual, and paperwork.

7.2007 Gibson Les Paul Studio, (front/back), (headstock), (case). Since 1983 Gibson has offered the Studio as an affordable alternative to the Standard, with all the tone and playability, but without the fancy cosmetic appointments. Although initially it was an all-mahogany body, it soon evolved into the maple cap that made it even closer to the standard. At one point in the mid-80s they even made a Studio Standard which had a bound body and neck, but still with dot inlays and screened logo. A decade or so later Gibson added trapezoid fretboard inlays which makes the guitar look very much like a Standard from the audience perspective. It remains to this day and excellent and more affordable alternative to players who could care less about binding and inlaid logos. Features include solid mahogany body with maple cap, rounded neck profile, rosewood fretboard, 490R and 498T Alnico II humbuckers, dual volume and tone controls with 3-way selector, Tuneomatic bridge with stop bar tailpiece, Gibson Deluxe tuners, gloss lacquer finish, and chrome hardware. Judging by the clean condition of the frets and overall appearance, this guitar hasnt been played very much but at least for one night it had a careless owner with a mean belt buckle (as shown here). If youre a player who doesnt mind a little bit of character, sort of like pre-washed jeans, this is an excellent playing Les Paul and easy on the wallet at $850(SOLD-Mike G 2/2/18).

8.Gibson Les Paul Bugs, (front), (back). Okay, heres a model youve never had a shot at – because its the only one in existence. Available only through GibsonsCustom Directservice, where your $500 membership gives you access to the rarest of the rare. For this particular guitar, Gibson commissioned noted artistCarol Paulsenas part of their Art of the Guitar II to paint two bug guitars – this Les Paul and an ES-5 ( the ES-5 subsequently sustained a damaged neck, never retailed, and was blown out in a charity auction). As much a work of art as it is a playable instrument, the Bugs features a Les Paul Standard with hand-painted bugs on the top, as well as the highest quality Abalonefretboard inlays. Its hard to capture the the beauty and intricacy of her paining in great detail but here are some attempts:pic3pic4pic5pic6pic7pic8. Includesoriginal caseand warranty card. This guitar was collector owned, unplayed, and mint condition other than very sight tarnish on the edges of the pickups – we can replace the pickup covers if desired. This guitar was obtained through an IRS auction where the original owner, with the finest collection imaginable, was forced to sell off dozens of highly-prized guitars, most of which remained unplayed. Cost to the original owner on this guitar was $10,000. There was not a list price, that was the actual selling price. Offered here, at my humble site, for just $7000. One of these days I hope to contact Ms. Paulsen and, hopefully, offer it on her site as well.

9.2008 Gibson Les Paul Push Tone 167, (front/back), (headstock), (Detail-back), (Extra pickups), (Case/Acc.). Gibsons Guitar of the Month (GOTM) for May 08. Never retailed and offered in mint condition. Last year Gibson offered a unique collection of monthly limited editions, with production limited to just 1000/each, an idea that was previously used with their Showcase Editions (link here) in 1988. Clean examples of Showcases go for significantly higher than their regular production counterparts and these guitars should also prove to be good investment pieces. Most of the 2008 models featured cool colors and pickup/hardware variations but this one is truly radical. The Les Paul Push Tones defining feature are easily switchable pickups (click herefor a demo) and each guitar comes with a pair of BurstBucker Pros and a pair of P-94s that attach wirelessly to the body using strong magnets. Burstbucker Pros for the classic fat Paul sound you know and love, while the P94s are actually P90 single coils that are designed to fit in a regular humbucker slot – giving you 4 mix-and-match pickup combinations for loads of tonal flexibility. The pickups load through the back and each is complete with the pickup already attached to the mounting bracket, and each comes with a quick-connect plug. In addition to this unique pickup options this is a killer Les Paul with a lacquer finish in Antique Natural with a beautiful AAA maple top. The flame on this one is rather unique and is definitely nicer than the average Push Tone, with thin ribbons in a chevron pattern at the bottom, becoming straight across at the middle, transitioning into reverse chevron at the top. Its a very pleasing look. Other unique options of this model include: Maple fretboard inlays, Ebony fretboard, 50s rounded neck profile, locking Grover tuners, Neutrik locking output jack, commemorative case with commemorative interior shroud, and a very clean look without a pickguard, pickup rings, or selector ring. Other specs are the same as a regular Les Paul Standard. This was one of the more expensive GOTM models with a list price of $4399, discounted to $2899. This one is better than new, totally untouched except for a killer setup by Martin, inevitably better than factory, and priced $400 less than aregularStandard Plus at just $2399. For full specsclick herefor Gibsons site. Trades on Fender Custom Shop and PRS are desired.

1.1972 Gibson SG Deluxe Walnut, (front), (back), (headstock), (pot datespickups), (). 44 year old guitars rarely look this good! This is one of those 10%ers that has been well cared for its whole life. Oh, its been played, but this is how they can look when theyre adult owned and cared for. No breaks or repairs, finish has a nice patina with minimal checking, no overspray or other funny business. Pots are all 72 and all caps are stock as well. The only change is at some point pickups were swapped out with a 79/80 set of Gibson T-Tops. They probably sounded better than the stock pickups since it would be rare for PAFs to wear out in 7-8 years. This is, after all, an excellent sounding SG. Finished in Walnut-stained mahogany, it features the Gibson-stamped Bigsby tremolo which works very well and adds a different dimension you dont get with most Gibsons. Original Grover tuners work perfectly with no slippage. This guitar has a perfectly straight neck and although these arent the tallest frets, it sets up very low with no fret outs. I have a buddy that always says old wood is better wood and maybe thats part of the key to this guitars tone. It sounds and feels superb. If youre thinking about plunking down major cash for a recent SG Standard, why not go for a vintage model thats probably going to sound better. $1699(Tent. Hold Adam G 6/26/18)takes this beauty. Includes original case and manual/warranty.

2.1972 Gibson SG I, (front), (back), (headstock/neck), (optional case). In the early 70s Gibson built a number of moderately priced SGs. General construction and fit/finish was on par with their higher end models but they kept down cost with unbound necks, screened logos, front-mounted controls, dot inlays, and plain bridges/tailpieces. Even the high end models like the Custom, Deluxe, and Pro sported front-mounted controls and jack, mounted on a plastic plate, rather than the traditional method of routing the back and avoiding the need for a control plate. The budget models came in one or two pickups, beginning in 71 with the SG 100, SG 200, and SG 250, all with single coil pickups. In 72 Gibson came out with the SG I, II, and III, all with mini humbuckers. These were short-lived models, introduced in 1972 and discontinued in 1974. The I was available in Cherry or Walnut finishes with a single mini-humbucker; the II was the same guitar but with an additional mini humbucker; the III same as the II but in Cherry Sunburst finish. While the earlier 100-series used a crude newly-designed bridge with a sheet metal cover, the I-series resorted to the 50s tried and true wraparound stud tailpiece, compensated for better intonation. This SG I features the beveled edges and silhouette that define the SG, but body is made of walnut rather than the traditional mahogany; necks is mahogany. Tuners are Kluson Gibson Deluxe 3/strip with metal Keystone buttons. Other features include raised black pickguard, black teardrop control plate with volume/tone controls and output jack, witch hat knobs, adjustable mini humbucker with black cover, and black headstock face with gold screened logo. For 40+ years this guitar is in nice shape with some clearcoat scratches or dings but no cracks or finish checking. As is typical, the cherry finish has faded on top and is much more vibrant on the back. Set up is comfortable and it has a fairly loud acoustic tone. For players who like simplicity, nothing beats a single pickup and wraparound tailpiece. I also find string muting extremely easy with the wraparound bridge. Appears all original including electronics, with pots 29th week of 71 (pic). I got this without a case but Im offering it with one of my spare vintage SG cases, pictured above, for $850(SOLD-Kevin H 7/7), or with a gigbag for $750.

3.2003 Gibson SG Special Limited Edition Platinum, (front), (headstock), (back), (gigbag). Very unique SG – Limited Edition Platinum with all chrome/platinum parts (pic here) including body, plastic, and hardware. All mahogany construction gives it that classic warm SG tone that has helped define the sound of rock, most notably with Angus Young. This model also features an Ebony fretboard, usually reserved for higher-end models, which gives it a little more snap on the attack than rosewood. Pickups are 490R/498T Alnico II humbuckers. You Fallout Boy fans might remember front man and guitarist Patrick Stump playing this model when they were becoming huge, before his jump to Gretsch. If you like low action – youll love this guitar. Its got a great neck which allowed us to set the action very low. The necks a tad on the chunky side, much closer to a 50s rounded neck than a 60s thin taper. Dont confuse this with the faded series. This is the gloss finish model and it sold in stores for $1049 during its last year of production 6 years ago. This one is pretty much immaculate – no scratches, dings, or fret wear, an easy 9.8 – and wouldnt look out of place hanging with brand new guitars in your local store. Just a super gloss-finished SG that plays as nice as it looks. $799 includes original gigbag.

4.1973 Gibson SG Standard, (front), (back), (headstock), (pots/switch), (Gibson/Bigsby), (case).Killer SG in lovely vintage condition, a classic rock icon from the 70s. Pickups are the sought after Super Humbuckers, designed by Bill Lawrence and easily identifiable by the black epoxy on the underside (pic). This guitar sounds incredible, plays fantastic, and is an excellent example of Gibsons early 70s guitars. Features include mahogany body and neck, ebony fretboard, block inlays, 22 frets, factory Gibson/Bigsby tailpiece, wide Schaller-made tune-o-matic bridge, Gibson/Schaller tuners, narrow 1-9/16 nut, and 24-3/4 scale. All original except for two pots replaced in 1983. Youll note the rounded end of the fretboard (shown here under blacklight), which is more associated with Gibson acoustics but you will see the occasional solid body. Google it and youll find one recently sold by Elderly with the same feature. Cosmetically, very nice vintage condition with just the usual scratches in the clear coat but nothing through to the finish. No cracks, no repairs, a very solid piece, ready for another 40+ years of jamming. Includes the proper case for a Bigsby-equipped SG, the rectangular tolex case with plush purple lining, top of the line model. Very cool SG with a factory Bigsby for $1950.

5.1997 Gibson SG Special with Upgrades, (front), (back), (headstock), (pickups), (case). For you EMG fans out there, this one just had a new set installed, plus a set of Hipshot locking tuners. Pickups are anEMG-89in the neck, which pairs perfectly with theEMG-81bridge. The 89 has the bonus feature of being splitable via push/pull pot which gives it the ability to deliver Strat-type sounds, or traditional fat humbucker tones. EMGs sound great in an all mahogany guitar and this is definitely better sounding than any Special Ive had. Also upgraded were the tuners, which now feature a new set of Hipshot locking type. All work was done by my man Martin, so you know its done right. Lastly, pickguard was changed to a white with beveled edge, which is gives it a cool tuxedo appearance. Cosmetically this guitar has its share of scratches and dings but as the frets are perfect, Ill chalk that up to a non-meticulous owner who gigged with it for a brief period. The set up is fantastic and with excellent sustain, this guitar is definitely a winner. If youre not looking for the flash of a Standard, but are more concerned with tone, this is a sweet axe for $679. Includes original brown case with non-working combo latch and missing the latch from another latch – no problem, it stays closed just fine.

6.2001 Gibson SG Special – Gloss Black, (front), (headstock), (back), (gigbag).The SG Special provides the classic SG tone, but without the cosmetic features of a Standard, its a better bargain. It features an un-bound neck, dot inlays, screened logo, and uncovered pickups, but is otherwise the same guitar. Its all mahogany construction with unmistakable beveled edges gives it that classic warm SG tone that has helped define the sound of rock, most notably with Angus Young. The light weight, thin body, and deep cutaways make it one of the most comfortable guitars to play. Pickups are 490R/490T Alnico humbuckers. The neck is well rounded and on the chunky side, but not as chunky as a 50s style.Dont confuse this with the faded series, which are good guitars in their own right, but this is the gloss finish model which sells new for a $1K. For more infoclick herefor Gibsons site. A new Special in black or cherry is going to set you back $999 but this ones in excellent condition with a great set up for just $679 with the older & better Gibson wedge-shaped gigbag.

GIBSON OR USA EPI SEMI-HOLLOW & ARCHTOPS:

1952 Gibson ES-125 Hollowbody Archtop, (front) (front-2), (back), (back-2), (headstock), (tailpiece), (case).From Gibsons Golden and lovely condition, especially for 60+ years old. The ES-125s were near the bottom of the price list for Gibson archtops of this era, but that only means minimal cosmetics appointments. It received the same care in manufacture as the higher end models. The 125 has a laminated 16 1/4 body with maple top and mahogany back and sides, with mahogany neck and Brazilian fretboard (pic) and bridge, finished in nitrocellulose lacquer. Although they made a thinner version (125T), this is the original full depth model, 3.5 deep. Other features include 24.75 scale, single P90 pickup in neck position with volume and tone controls, tortoise grain pickguard, Kluson strip tuners, nickel trapeze tailpiece, bound body top and back, pearloid dot fingerboard inlays, silkscreen logo, Sunburst finish only. Early features (pic) include half-clear/half-gold knobs, and rounded P90 cover. The pickup has 6 adjustable poles between two Alnico 5 bar magnets, which is fairly mellow, not as harsh as some P90s were in the 50s. The tone is well suited for Jazz, or even Delta blues. Cosmetically, its in beautiful shape with minimal finish checking, little to no players wear, no cracks or repairs; just a very nice example of this model. Only noteworthy flaw is a bit of finish peeling on the back, bottom edge (pic), probably from a wooden stand. The set up is low and comfortable. These have gone up considerably over the past 15 years but this one is still and excellent buy for an early 50s in this condition. $1699 includes a quality hardshell case.

1952 Gibson ES-150 Hollowbody Archtop, (), (back), (back-2), (), (side), ().52 must have been a big year as I recently got in this ES-150, and ES-125, and Fender Deluxe 8-string, all from 1952. This ES-150 is in beautiful shape, with no issues or excuses, and all original other than replacement Gibson tuners. The ES-150 was clearly above the ES-125 during this era, with a wider 17 body, bound neck, trapezoid inlays, and multi-layer pickguard. By appointments, it was close to an ES-175, except for headstock ornamentation. Specs include laminated 17 body, 3.5 deep, with maple top and mahogany back and sides, with mahogany neck and Brazilian fretboard and bridge, finished in nitrocellulose lacquer, 24.75 scale, single P90 pickup in neck position with volume and tone controls, multi-layer black pickguard, nickel trapeze tailpiece, bound body top and back, pearloid trapazoid fingerboard inlays, bound neck, silkscreen logo, Sunburst finish only. Early features include half-clear/half-gold knobs, and rounded P90 cover. The pickup has 6 adjustable poles between two Alnico 5 bar magnets, which is fairly mellow, not as harsh as some P90s were in the 50s. The tone is well suited for Jazz, or even Delta blues. Cosmetically, its in beautiful shape with minimal finish checking, little to no players wear, no cracks or repairs; just a very nice example of this model. Set up is low and comfortable. These have gone up considerably over the past 15 years but this one is still and excellent buy for an early 50s in this condition. $2100 includes a quality hardshell case.

1969 Gibson Super 400CES, (No hype – simply the best quilt ever). One-owner guitar, uncirculated, and a desirable pre-70 Super. The Super 400CES was Gibsons top of the line archtop and this one has the finest quilted maple Ive ever seen on this model. As soon as I opened the case and flipped it over, I heard Martin catch his breath. It was for him, quite literally, breath-taking. (front/back/side), (headstock/flamed neck), (flamed neck), (serial/label). This is one of those finds that collectors wait for – a one owner guitar, bought new in 1969, and rarely saw the light of day since new. It has never been circulated and is being sold only because of the owners inability to play any longer.Ive only owned a few Super 400s, but Iveseenplenty and this is the finest of the fine. The worst flaw is very typical – deterioration of the pickguard. High quality repros are available from a number of sources but the original is included, along with the bracket. Other flaws on this guitar are minimal (picture) and include light wear to some of the gold plating on pickups and tailpiece, and very minor rubs on edge of headstock. You have to look hard to find any flaws on this guitar but held in perfect light, you can see a slight clear-coat impression on the back where the guitar rested on the pickguard inside the case (pic) but, again, it must be viewed at the perfect angle, and very closely, to see. Includesoriginal casewith accessories -hang tag,manual, strap, cable, pickguard and bracket. There are no loose braces or other detractors that require maintenance. Its hard to place a value on a guitar like this. If an example with typically good flame is worth $X, how much more for perhaps the nicest quilt imaginable. To a collector looking for the finest uncirculated example Ive personally seen, I consider this one very reasonably priced at $10,000. This is the most incredible Gibson archtop Ive ever held and Im sure the new owner will feel likewise.

1967 Epiphone Riviera E360TD Wayne, (front), (back), (), (finish checking), (label), (case), (Wayne inlay). Excellent quality Gibson-made Epi from the Kalamazoo MI factory. During the 60s Epiphones were made by Gibson through 1970, when production shifted to Japan. Most Epis have a similar Gibson counterpoint and in the case of the E360TD, it is the Gibson ES-335TD, with the same woods, dimensions, finishes, etc., with the most outward difference being the parallelogram inlays on the Epi, while Gibson used blocks on the late 60s ES-335. Additionally, the Gibson used PAF size humbuckers, while the Epi used the newer Mini-humbuckers, which in this case have the PAF sticker on the underside. Last owner, who had this guitar for 10 years, never noticed this but it has an old headstock repair (), which we spotted only after viewing a pic with a flash which upon closer inspection was a very clean crack repair. It was a good j